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He mau ninau ola: Some health questions

Ka Wai Ola
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By Kekuni Blaisdell, M.D. From the March 1987 edition of Ka Wai Ola Ninau: E ke Kauka, since pure Hawaiians have more sickness than us part Hawaiians, doesn't that mean that Hawaiians have bad genes and it is better for us to marry non-Hawaiians? Pane Mokuna (Part)...

OHA Board of Trustees announces approval of Kūlia Grants program awards

Ka Wai Ola
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Ten organizations to receive funding for programs that benefit the Native Hawaiian community Launching this Spring, OHA is awarding $500,000 to 10 non-profit organizations under its Kūlia Grants Program. Through this pilot program, OHA is providing smaller, one-year grant awards for projects that benefit the...

Laulani Teele

Ka Wai Ola
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Mana, being a spiritual force, is intrinsically tied to pono, and also to ea, that spiritual life force of sovereignty that is internal to each Kanaka. In that respect, true mana is different from other types of power – such as the power that...

Honoring Prince Kūhiō at the Ha‘akoa Conference

Ka Wai Ola
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Prince Kūhiō Day is an official holiday in the state of Hawai‘i. It is celebrated annually on March 26, to mark the birth of Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalaniana‘ole, heir to the throne of the Kingdom of Hawai‘i, and recognize the many wonderful things he...

Ola ka inoa (The name lives)

In Hawai‘i, many towns, districts and streets, are named for a natural geographical characteristic, historical event, mythical spirit, or famous inhabitant. Learning the story about these names can open new doors of wonder. An example is the southeasternmost district on O‘ahu, Maunalua (two mountains)....

The Reverend Canon Malcolm Nāea Chun: Hawaiian Historian, Anglican Minister, Healer

Photo: Malcom Chun
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“My own interest in the Hawaiian language newspapers began in the early 1970s. I was an undergraduate student at the University of Hawaiʻi, Mānoa campus and I enrolled in a course on “reading Hawaiian” taught by Professor Rubellite Kawena (Kinney) Johnson. She introduced us,...

The Language of Lanikila

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A few years ago, a question piqued Kahikinaokalā Kūkea-Shultz’s young mind. What varieties of kalo could survive best in brackish water? Kahikinaokalā’s goal was to help figure out how to adapt lo‘i to better handle the effects of climate change and sea level rise. Like...

Healthy System for a Healthy People

Aloha mai kākou, Health is a major concern for us all, and is a key strategic priority of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. In the Western model, the focus is on the individual. But in the indigenous perspective, we look at the collective – the...