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News Briefs | June 2022

Photo: OHA Staff
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OHA Office Blessings As part of OHA's reopening of its offices to the public after two years of teleworking, office blessings were planned for all OHA offices across the pae ʻāina. OHA Film Wins Telly Award OHA’s Mana i Mauli Ola short film has won a Telly...

Public Land Trust Bill Awaits Governor’s Signature

Ka Wai Ola
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A Public Land Trust bill that would increase the Office of Hawaiian Affairs’ pro rata share of the Public Land Trust revenue has been passed by the 2022 Hawaiʻi State Legislature and is currently awaiting Gov. David Ige’s signature.

Everybody Loves Rae

Ka Wai Ola
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Rae Makanani Nam’s ʻano is so powerfully beautiful that you can feel it come right through your computer email.

Hoʻohui ʻOhana | Family Reunions: June 2022

Ka Wai Ola
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E nā ʻohana Hawaiʻi: If you are planning a reunion or looking for genealogical information, Ka Wai Ola will print your listing at no charge on a space-available basis. Listings should not exceed 200 words. OHA reserves the right to edit all submissions for...

The Epic Story of Kawelo of Hanalei

Photo: Rare photo of Nīhoa Island
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The story of Kawelo is one of the most well-known epics from Kauaʻi.

Puʻu Lei o Liliʻu: Aunties’ Hui

Ka Wai Ola
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Native Hawaiian (NH) kamaliʻi are disproportionately represented in the Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems.

Kauaʻi Island Project Updates

Ka Wai Ola
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Last Month, the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands provided a status update for several projects occurring on Maui.

E NHLC…

I found records in OHA’s Kīpuka Database that my ancestor was awarded, and owned, kuleana lands.

A Few Thoughts About Kamehameha I

Ka Wai Ola
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The State of Hawaiʻi celebrates Kamehameha I Day on June 11, an event which began on Dec. 11, 1871, as a day to celebrate the birthday of Kamehameha V with horseback riding and other sporting events.

My Time as an Intern at the Legislature

Photo: Hema Watson and his fellow KONO peers
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This past legislative session, I had the opportunity to intern for Rep. Jeanné Kapela at the state capitol.

A New Era at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs’ decades-long fight to receive its fair share of Public Land Trust revenues was detailed recently in a Star-Advertiser editorial.

Our Place in Tourism vs. Tourism in Our Place

Ka Wai Ola
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In many ways, the ideals of regenerative tourism are not new. Native Hawaiians have been nurturing regenerative systems in Hawaiʻi since the first voyage from Kahiki.

What is The Trust for Public Land?

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The Trust for Public Land is a national nonprofit organization working to protect land as parks and open space.

Statement from OHA Board Chair Carmen “Hulu” Lindsey on the passing of former Board Chair Colette Machado

Photo: Colette Machado
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The Office of Hawaiian Affairs was shocked and saddened by the news of the passing of former OHA Board Chair Colette Machado on May 23, 2022.

Wainiha Community Resilience Center: A Vision to Help the Isolated North Shore of Kauaʻi Prepare for Disaster Events

Photo: Landslide covers a road at Keapana
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Record-breaking rainstorms battered the North Shore of Kauaʻi in April 2018.

From the Merrie Monarch Royal Parade to a Public Land Trust Win

Photo: Trustee Akaka and her ʻohana
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What an honor to represent OHA in the 59th Annual Merrie Monarch Royal Parade.

The Pākōlea Program: Encouraging a Circular Economy

Photo: Pākōlea Program cohort
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Established to bolster Hawaiʻi’s emerging entrepreneurs and encourage a circular economy throughout the islands, the Pākōlea pilot program has taken its cohort members through a month-long virtual pitch bootcamp aimed to dramatically improve and refine their sales pitches, as well as to develop a better understanding of the standards of local and regional distribution partners.

Alakoko: Restoring Kauaʻi’s Most Famous Fishpond

Photo: Volunteers work to restore a historic ʻauwai
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It is said that his fishpond was built in a single night, and that the rocks that were laid for both of the fishponds came from the sea below Makali‘i, which is perhaps a mile or so away from Niumalu, but it is also said that the distance away could be two miles or longer.

“Ka Wiliwili o Kaupeʻa”

Photo: Salmon Pua
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The arid coralline limestone plain of Honouliuli ma kai, west of Puʻuloa, grew many thousands of years ago when the sea level was much higher.

Our Kūpuna Amplified Their Natural Resources

Ka Wai Ola
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Peleke Flores recalls his tūtū talking about seeing huge “blooms” of fish like shadow balls on the shoreline when she was growing up – and telling him that her own tūtū told her they used to be much bigger.